Did he really just do this?!

fayizchess87

I was playing a rapid game when suddenly my opponent just spam pushed his pawns and decided to give up on development. This surprised me as I had no idea on what to do at all causing me to feel very uncomfortable. I proceeded with the standard opening principles and ultimately couldn’t tell how I was meant to proceed. This made me panic so I offered a draw and then breathed a sigh of relief when my opponent excepted.

So, can someone please explain to me what I am meant to do when my opponent does this?

fayizchess87

 

SeanBrikey
The opening he play is the Grand Prix attack you should move Nc6 and e6 then d5 fight back by trying to break up his pawns also don’t fianchetto in the Grand Prix it isn’t very useful
SeanBrikey
If you want to learn more about the Grand Prix look in the opening thingy
SeanBrikey
If you don’t know the Grand Prix don’t play scillian
fayizchess87

@SeanBrikey actually according to an openings course on a different site, it’s good to fianchetto in the Grand Prix.

llama

Pawn breaks favor the side who is better developed (or has more active pieces). So just keep developing and keep playing pawn breaks.

karthik_kd

i would never play grand prix

 

iamunknown2

One chess principle, is to respond to a flank attack (kingside or queenside) with a play in the center. Additionally as others have mentioned, opening the position up with pawn breaks benefits the side which is more well-developed.

Yes, it can be quite scary when your opponent launches a pawn storm (especially a kingside one), but remember: the opponent's attack isn't worth anything if none of their pieces are out (unless they're planning on checkmating you with their pawns only, which is unlikely)!

In fact, I'd say White's king is in more trouble than Black's king! By castling then pushing all the pawns in front of his king, White has left his king completely exposed. This can be extremely dangerous, especially if Black opens up the position! Since Black has all his pieces out and White doesn't, it is actually Black who should be attacking - again, a pawn break opening the position would probably be incredibly dangerous for White, with his exposed king and lag in development.

In your case, multiple pawn breaks can be considered. You could consider d4, or b4-b5, or even f6 to open up the position to attack White's king.

sid0049
fayizchess87 wrote:

I was playing a rapid game when suddenly my opponent just spam pushed his pawns and decided to give up on development. This surprised me as I had no idea on what to do at all causing me to feel very uncomfortable. I proceeded with the standard opening principles and ultimately couldn’t tell how I was meant to proceed. This made me panic so I offered a draw and then breathed a sigh of relief when my opponent excepted.

So, can someone please explain to me what I am meant to do when my opponent does this?

Flag

Srimurugan108

I will be saying this is much of apple cardamom cake game