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thanks to billwall

  • #1

    Principles of Chess

    01.  Develop your pieces quickly.
    02.  Control the center.
    03.  Try to put your pieces on squares that give them maximum space.
    04.  Try to develop your knights towards the center.
    05.  A knight on the rim is dim.
    06.  Don't take unnecessary chances.
    07.  Play aggressive.
    08.  Calculate forced moves first.
    09.  Always ask yourself, "Can he put me in check or win a piece?"
    10.  Have a plan.  Every move should have a purpose.
    11.  Assume your opponent's move is his best move.
    12.  Ask yourself, "why did he move there?" after each opponent move.
    13.  Play for the initiative and contolling the board.
    14.  If you must lose a piece, get something for it if you can.
    15.  When behind, exchange pawns.  When ahead, exchange pieces.
    16.  If you are losing, don't give up fighting.  Look for counterplay.
    17.  Don't play unsound moves unless you are losing badly.
    18.  Don't sacrifice a piece without good reason.
    19.  If you are in doubt of an opponent's sacrifice, accept it.
    20.  Attack with more that just one or two pieces.
    21.  Do not make careless pawn moves.  They cannot move back.
    22.  Do not block in your bishops.
    23.  Bishops of opposite colors have the greatest chance of drawing.
    24.  Try not to move the same piece twice or more times in a row.
    25.  Exchange pieces if it helps your development.
    26.  Don't bring your queen out early.
    27.  Castle soon to protect your king and develop your rook.
    28.  Develop rooks to open files.
    29.  Put rooks behind passed pawns.
    30.  Study rook endgames.  They are the most common and most complicated.
    31.  Don't let your king get caught in the center.
    32.  Don't castle if it brings your king into greater danger from attack.
    33.  After castling, keep a good pawn formation around your king.
    34.  If you only have one bishop, put your pawns on its opposite color.
    35.  Trade pawns pieces when ahead in material or when under attack.
    36.  If cramped, free your game by exchanging material.
    37.  If your opponent is cramped, don't let him get any freeing exchanges.
    38.  Study openings you are comfortable with.
    39.  Play over entire games, not just the opening.
    40.  Blitz chess is helpful in recognizing chess patterns.  Play often.
    41.  Study annotated games and try to guess each move.
    42.  Stick with just a few openings with White, and a few openings with Black.
    43.  Record your games and go over them, especially the games you lost.
    44.  Show your games to higher rated opponents and get feedback from them.
    45.  Use chess computers and databases to help you study and play more.
    46.  Everyone blunders.  The champions just blunder less often.
    47.  When it is not your move, look for tactics and combinations.
    48.  Try to double rooks or double rook and queen on open files.
    49.  Always ask yourself, "Does my next move overlook something simple?"
    50.  Don't make your own plans without the exclusion of the opponent's threats.
    51.  Watch out for captures by retreat of an opponent's piece.
    52.  Do not focus on one sector of the board.  View thw whole board.
    53.  Write down your move first before making that move if it helps.
    54.  Try to solve chess puzzles with diagrams from books and magazines.
    55.  It is less likely that an opponent is prepared for off-beat openings.
    56.  Recognize transposition of moves from main-line play.
    57.  Watch your time and avoid time trouble. 
    58.  Bishops are worth more than knights except when they are pinned in.
    59.  A knight works better with a bishop than another knight.
    60.  It is usually a good idea to trade down into a pawn up endgame.
    61.  Have confidence in your game.
    62.  Play in as many rated events as you can.
    63.  Try not to look at your opponent's rating until after the game.
    64.  Always play for a win.

  • #2
    And let me add one little advice. Stay healthy. A sound mind in a sound body usually results in great chess.
  • #3

    Holy crap 64?!? Billwall who are you?

    (I especially like no. 20)

    EDIT: ((oh wait i just got it. sixty-four. ha.))

  • #4

    Bill Wall is titled Grandmaster in chess.

    Thanks a lot for the principle of chess.

  • #5
    Bill Wall is titled Grandpatzer in chess who once lived a checkered life and had no principles.  He is now trying to do right by trying to write about chess.
  • #6

    thats a lot to remember here is a list of only 20 that CM Bernard Parham gave me. that i have had a lot of success with.

    1) play for the earliest possible mate.

    2)Collect free material.

    3)Attack the weak square. (f2 and f3)

    4)Don't check when it can be blocked by a pawn from a pocket square.

    5)Don't occupy a bishop controlled square.

    6)Don't attack when being attacked.(some times it is hard to do)

    7)Don't trade without a gain.

    8)Don't initiate a trade without a gain.

    9)Support your pieces.

    10)INDEX! INDEX! INDEX! look at every possible square with every piece yours and theirs

    11)Don't touch a piece,square or opponent peice until you are ready to move it.

    12)Evaluate your move...move toawrds checkmate

    13)Maintain an attack posture.

    14)Record your move before you make it.

    15)develop your pieces with threats(tempo)

    16)Note the count of the pieces and on the squares.

    17)Take your time!!!! most tournements you have 2 hours

    18)No """IF""" chess. play it the way it really is

    19)Don't depend on mistakes... assume they will see everything

    20)Good sportsmanship is a must!

  • #7

    thanks prodigy, it can help me again...

  • #8

    In Prodigy's list....#3 should say.....

    3)Attack the weak square. (f2 and f7 - these are initially protected only by the King)

  • #9
    RussBell wrote:

    In Prodigy's list....#3 should say.....

    3)Attack the weak square. (f2 and f7 - these are initially protected only by the King)

    Good point Russ. Also, Prodigy's #14 is outdated: USCF now says you are to make your move before recording it. In my experience, that rule isn't really enforced, but I can imagine some opponent complaining to the TD if it's not followed.

    btw, good to see you again. I haven't been posting much and haven't seen much from you lately. Hope all is going well.

  • #10

    Yes, apparantly Prodigy's #14 is violation of FIDE's rules now too. Although anyone learning from books like "Think like a Grandmaster" have been taught to do this. Once again good olde FIDE introducing rules and regulations which don't help players....

  • #11

    Bill Wall's Chess Page....

    http://billwall.phpwebhosting.com/

  • #12
    RussBell wrote:

    Bill Wall's Chess Page....

    http://billwall.phpwebhosting.com/

    Why did Bill Wall withdraw from chess.com?

  • #13
    SeniorPatzer wrote:
    RussBell wrote:

    Bill Wall's Chess Page....

    http://billwall.phpwebhosting.com/

    Why did Bill Wall withdraw from chess.com?

    Don't know...

    But I just coincidentally stumbled upon this Bill Wall....in posts #23 & #36 of the following forum thread....

    https://www.chess.com/forum/view/general/radio-help?page=2

    https://www.chess.com/member/minichess

  • #14

    I'm wondering if that is the same Bill Wall who used to run chess tournaments in Xenia, Ohio in the early 1980's...

  • #15
    TwoMove έγραψε:

    Yes, apparantly Prodigy's #14 is violation of FIDE's rules now too. Although anyone learning from books like "Think like a Grandmaster" have been taught to do this. Once again good olde FIDE introducing rules and regulations which don't help players....

    Actually this rule exists since 2008.

  • #16
    TwoMove wrote:

    Yes, apparantly Prodigy's #14 is violation of FIDE's rules now too. Although anyone learning from books like "Think like a Grandmaster" have been taught to do this. Once again good olde FIDE introducing rules and regulations which don't help players....

    I recommend actively boycott this "rule".

  • #17

    Bill Wall is a mythical user for those of us who like the endless chess quiz.

  • #18

    There are 3 symbols used for closed accounts, his is the same one used for fairplay but doesn't say fairplay on it. The others are abuse which is red with an x, and there's a white one where the user closed their own account.

    When it simply says Closed with no reason we have to speculate but it may well be a fair-play violation anyway. However they may have preserved his blogs which may therefore be why we don't see the "fair play" reason next to his name.

    I know in the past the didn't always use that anyway.

    I've also seen the Closed icon (without the Fair Play) used for someone who died. However it appears he is still alive.

    What a horrible name though to have. Mainly because of what it rhymes with..

     

  • #19

    What I read its very good, a long list.

  • #20
    SeniorPatzer wrote:
    RussBell wrote:

    Bill Wall's Chess Page....

    http://billwall.phpwebhosting.com/

    Why did Bill Wall withdraw from chess.com?

    I analyzed Bill Wall's online games here using T3 statistics. They were contaminated with artificial purity. I guess Bill Wall got an offer to withdraw silently and he couldn't reject.

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