Best chess engine for a beginner

RMChess1954

Oh GUI is Graphic User Interface (the program you see to display the board).

mickynj

I'm sure others have already covered this, but the top engines all play extremely good chess, so I would strongly recommend that you download Stockfish, which is always at or close to the top of the computer rating list, and it's FREE!. you can download it at https://stockfishchess.org/.

 

Now this is just the engine, which does all the thinking, but doesn't handle input or out[ut or representing the board on a screen. For that, you need a chess playing program. Fritz is probably your best bet.

BTW: Fritz comes with its own engine, which is more than strong enough to crush all of us, so you don't really need to get another engine, But if you want one, get the free one!

KODIAMUSMAXIMUS

ChessKing available at the USCF site or https://chessking.com/ has a lot of nice "training" setups to play and practice against. It also has strong program, good sized database. Check out their videos on youtube.

JaseE22

I should maybe rephrase my original question. Which chess program would be best for a beginner? Houdini, Fritz, Komodo, etc? From reading Erebus can use Stickfish as an engine within if these programmes, so I'm trying to understand what distinguishes one programme from another and which would be better for me?

mickynj

The fact is, there isn't a whole lot of difference between them. Perhaps if you were a top grandmaster, using the engine to help with deep opening preparation, the tiny differences between the leading engines might mean something. But for us mortals, all the engines are so much stronger than we are that tiny differences don't matter. But none of them are particularly good at giving us good advice. The engine will show us its list of candidate moves in a position and give it's evaluation of each move, but it won't tell us "14.Ne4 is the best move because it helps control the dark squares around Black's king." If only it did! If you play out some of the lines the engine suggests, you will see, and get to recognize, a lot of tactical patterns. And examining the engine's choices will show you a lot about how to create and exploit weaknesses. But you will have to draw these conclusions for yourself! All the engine can tell you is that 14.Ne4 has an evaluation of +1.86, while 14.Re1 has an evaluation of 0.75. 

I'm not knocking engines--I use one all the time in analyzing my lost games. But engines by themselves are not the best learning tool

IMBacon
JaseE22 wrote:

I should maybe rephrase my original question. Which chess program would be best for a beginner? Houdini, Fritz, Komodo, etc? From reading Erebus can use Stickfish as an engine within if these programmes, so I'm trying to understand what distinguishes one programme from another and which would be better for me?

Any of the top engines are rated 3000+  Does it really matter to a beeginner if one is rated 3200, and another is rated 3250?  

Your games are won and lost due to blunders.

SonOfThunder2

Stockfish

 

 

 

 

 

L O L !

JaseE22
FishEyedFools wrote:
JaseE22 wrote:

I should maybe rephrase my original question. Which chess program would be best for a beginner? Houdini, Fritz, Komodo, etc? From reading Erebus can use Stickfish as an engine within if these programmes, so I'm trying to understand what distinguishes one programme from another and which would be better for me?

Any of the top engines are rated 3000+  Does it really matter to a beeginner if one is rated 3200, and another is rated 3250?  

Your games are won and lost due to blunders.

 

Why did you go for the Fritz user interface as opposed to one of the others?

 

JaseE22
mickynj wrote:

The fact is, there isn't a whole lot of difference between them. Perhaps if you were a top grandmaster, using the engine to help with deep opening preparation, the tiny differences between the leading engines might mean something. But for us mortals, all the engines are so much stronger than we are that tiny differences don't matter. But none of them are particularly good at giving us good advice. The engine will show us its list of candidate moves in a position and give it's evaluation of each move, but it won't tell us "14.Ne4 is the best move because it helps control the dark squares around Black's king." If only it did! If you play out some of the lines the engine suggests, you will see, and get to recognize, a lot of tactical patterns. And examining the engine's choices will show you a lot about how to create and exploit weaknesses. But you will have to draw these conclusions for yourself! All the engine can tell you is that 14.Ne4 has an evaluation of +1.86, while 14.Re1 has an evaluation of 0.75. 

I'm not knocking engines--I use one all the time in analyzing my lost games. But engines by themselves are not the best learning tool

 

Thanks for the input, appreciate it!

 

IMBacon
JaseE22 wrote:
FishEyedFools wrote:
JaseE22 wrote:

I should maybe rephrase my original question. Which chess program would be best for a beginner? Houdini, Fritz, Komodo, etc? From reading Erebus can use Stickfish as an engine within if these programmes, so I'm trying to understand what distinguishes one programme from another and which would be better for me?

Any of the top engines are rated 3000+  Does it really matter to a beeginner if one is rated 3200, and another is rated 3250?  

Your games are won and lost due to blunders.

 

Why did you go for the Fritz user interface as opposed to one of the others?

 

No particular reason actually.  Though i do like the Blunder Check option.

mickynj

The Fritz interface is pretty easy to use and has a lot of nice features. I'm sure that some of the other interfaces are fine too, but the Fritz/Chessbase interface decent, and provides easy access to other chessbase training tools

SeniorPatzer

I would assume that the Fritz UCI integrates more nicely with the Fritz chess engine.  And that while the Fritz UCI can run on top of other engines, the other engines might not utilize all the functionality of the Fritz UCI as well as the Fritz engine. Is my assumption true?

IMBacon
SeniorPatzer wrote:

I would assume that the Fritz UCI integrates more nicely with the Fritz chess engine.  And that while the Fritz UCI can run on top of other engines, the other engines might not utilize all the functionality of the Fritz UCI as well as the Fritz engine. Is my assumption true?

The Fritz interface has a lot of nice featues, that any chess engine can utilize.  

JaseE22
mickynj wrote:

The Fritz interface is pretty easy to use and has a lot of nice features. I'm sure that some of the other interfaces are fine too, but the Fritz/Chessbase interface decent, and provides easy access to other chessbase training tools

 

Thankvyou. What exactly is Chessbase 14. I know it is a database but just trying to get an idea of how/if it is usedbinconjunction with a programme like Fritz.

 

It seems like Fritz is fairly highly regarded an may bevthe way to go. Along with using Stockfish potentially as well. I also assumed using a different engine wouldn't work as well