SHARE A CHESS TIP!

USArmyParatrooper

I’ll start. A piece that’s only one square away (diagonally) from a Knight is physically close but actually very far away. It takes the Knight three moves just to attack the square, and often all pathways are guarded or blocked. 

 

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godsofhell1235

I'll post something similar.

People like to talk about how mobile bishops are compared to knights, but check this out.

A centralized knight can land on nearly any square on the board in only 3 moves (or less).
(squares it can't land on in 3 moves highlighted)

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godsofhell1235

More knight stuff.

An old saying goes, the knight is the best friend of the king.

When under mating attack with a queen infiltration, sometimes a nearby knight can cool things off quickly.

In the diagram below, the knight defends against all checks.

 

USArmyParatrooper

Oh wow good stuff 👍

 

Love that second one.

godsofhell1235

I love static evaluations / generating candidate moves with logic (no calculation).

I have some "rules" I follow, maybe I'll share some later.

But since they're mine and not a GM's I'm hesitant because they might be flawed. I'll start with something I've seen in books and definitely makes sense.


A point that's a little more advanced is that for a rook endgame, I would say white's pawn structure is superior.

But why? Isn't it nearly identical?

Notice that the weak pawns that are typical targets for black are a7, c7, and f7.

White's are a4, c3, and f2.

What's the difference? Black's are all on the same rank, this is like an all you can eat buffet for a rook. All white's pawns are on separate ranks.

If one player is defending successfully, and it's up to the other player to choose when and how to try a new angle of attack, it's common to see that player first put his weak pawns on separate ranks, and then try any new plans he can figure out.

godsofhell1235

Another pawn related tip, this time for queen endgames where king shelter becomes a primary element to evaluate the position. If you king has no cover, then often you'll be drawn with a perpetual even if you're up a lot of material.

(So just pretend these are part of a bigger position with more things going on tongue.png)

Which is the best king shelter? White's pawns are often ideal. It avoids perpetual checks (you'll always have an in-between move to spend promoting your pawn, starting checks of your own, or bringing a defender over), and if f2 is defended by a piece, then after the king hides on h2 all checks will end.

 

 

 

So before going into a crazy "my threats and promoting pawns vs your threats and promoting pawns," it's common enough to see a player first make a king shelter like white, and place his king on h2, and only then initiate the crazy battle.

Waredude
Don't hang your Queen!
USArmyParatrooper

godsofhell 👍👍

Reggie_da_Great

Do not ever do a three times fold repetition

 

godsofhell1235

Here's a position that has two patterns that are telling black he needs to move his knight on f6. Either one is enough on its own, but I thought it'd be fun to show a position that has both.

 

Nd7 is very logical.

When on f6, there are two miserable pieces in black's position. The first one is the knight itself. White's main pawn chain (in particular the f3 pawn) is taking away all the knight's advanced squares. The knight definitely wants to relocate given a chance.

The other miserable piece is the g7 bishop. Sure it's potentially good, but not as long as there's a knight blocking it. In many fianchetto positions a knight on the 3rd rank (or for black the 6th rank) has a high priority to relocate.

(A small note, a knight on the 4th/5th blocking a finachettoed bishop is not so bad as it's a knight in the center, and if the bishop is helping cement it there, it's often content enough and isn't shouting at the pony to move).

ponz111

If you are trying to solve a  chess tactic--look first at ALL checks no matter how weird they may look at first glance...

godsofhell1235

Oh, and one of my posts makes it sound like I didn't come up with the rook one, but I came up with the others. That's not true. I'm still sticking to common ones, I didn't come up with those myself grin.png

ponz111

here is an example of my tip

Reggie_da_Great

Now this position looks very creative to me. O-O is very basic. If you take the knight with the bishop, you MUST close this position. Again, with more bishops, less knights, open position.

Reggie_da_Great

 

 

USArmyParatrooper
Reggie_da_Great wrote:
 

Now this position looks very creative to me. O-O is very basic. If you take the knight with the bishop, you MUST close this position. Again, with more bishops, less knights, open position.

 Isn’t it hard to keep the position closed by force, though?  I mean once the pawns are already staggered and locked, yeah it’s hard to open.  But prior to that if one side wants to open it up it’s pretty hard to stop it. 

 

 Unless someone has a suggestion.  Generally speaking I like open positions anyway, but when I run into a night versus bishop situation I’m cognitive of wanting to keep the position closed. It’s just not easy to do from some positions. 

ponz111

Trick to double rooks on a file [per Karpov]



ponz111

This chess tip is mainly for a slow game such as corresponence chess or Vote Chess.

Broaden your horizons. Look at every move at least briefly.



ponz111

Watch for back rank tactics

A. Sandrin  vs D Taylor   US Open 1973

Black to move



Powerboat

Great thread. 🕶