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What would you recommend for Black against the Queen's gambit?


  • 18 months ago · Quote · #1

    ajp13

    I usually play ...Nf6 against 1.d4, but after reading repeated warnings that the Indian defense is too complicated for a beginner I've opted to play the Queen's pawn game instead. What line would you recommend against the Queen's gambit?

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #2

    NightFactory

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #3

    Crazychessplaya

    Used to play the Benoni, switched to the Tartakower var. Much safer, if maybe a bit boring.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #4

    golabomb

    why dont u try the kings indian defense against 1.d4 . i can recommend a few books that may help u unravel its explosive power

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #5

    ajp13

    golabomb, I meant to write ...Nf6 in my (now edited) opening post. I don't want to play the King's Indian because of its supposed complexity. I would prefer a simpler and less theory-driven opening to play.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #6

    TitanCG

    If you are a beginner then queen's gambit declined is the way to go. Lasker leads to clearer position than Tartakower and is less confusing LOL. Here is Kasparov on "how to play the Tartakower."



  • 18 months ago · Quote · #7

    Slovenly

    I've always thought that for beginners, the Chigorin (1.d4 d5 2.c4 Nc6) made far more sense than the QGD.

    I think the latter mostly gets recommended because it's the opening that GM's use that also flows most naturally from an initial central, symmetrical pawn move.

    But the QGD tends to play out as a subtle, positional game with lots of in-between moves, timing issues, radical redeployments of knights and such.

    The Chigorin is no doubt inferior at the GM level.  The intially blocked c-pawn, if given freedom to move, has proven over the years that it will give you slightly better chances agaisnt GM level opposition.

    This shouldn't be an issue for a beginner.

    In the Chigorin, the knight gets deployed to its most obvious and sensible square, the games tend to be very open with a lot of piece play, and the timing issues and subtle shifts in plan aren't nearly as prevalent.  Play for ...e5, which is where the most general precepts of opening theory tell beginners pawns want to be anyway -- on those central squares.

    As a runner up, the QGA is a good choice.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #8

    chessBBQ

    The best defense against d4 is probably a combination of Nimzoindian,Semi-Slav and a little bit of KID.It's all about the transpositions.It would be better to expose yourself to alot of openings in the long run I think.

    But if you want to cut it down I'd say the QGD is the most principled

    And the KID is the most fun

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #9

    Quasimorphy

    My thoughts on the matter are that if you need to ask, you should probably be playing the QGD(maybe the Tarrasch, Lasker, or Tartakower variation.)

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #10

    DENVERHIGH

             I like the Budapest Defence.

    You don't know what that is?  Hmmmm. . . .

    Only because I dislike playing against the D4 opening.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #12

    Super_Blade

    The Albin Counter-Gambit!

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #13

    Estragon

    You need to gain a working knowledge of all of them by playing them in enough games to understand the ideas.  QG Accepted, then the Orthodox, Lasker's Defense, and the Tartakower, as well as the Tarrasch Defense.  All of the pawn structures are related in some ways, it is important to experience the different approaches.

    It wouldn't hurt your development as a player to try out the Ragozin, either, after those.  Then give the Slav family a whirl.

     

    Until you understand the problems and possibilities in the d4/d5 openings, you just can't begin to comprehend the Indian defenses and other alternatives like the Dutch.   You may play them and have some success at lower levels, but it won't be because you have a clue what you are doing.

    It's like saying you want to pursue a career in math, but instead of paying attention and learning in school, you want to start out at Renesselaer.  It just doesn't work that way.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #14

    plutonia

    Estragon wrote:

    Until you understand the problems and possibilities in the d4/d5 openings, you just can't begin to comprehend the Indian defenses and other alternatives like the Dutch.   You may play them and have some success at lower levels, but it won't be because you have a clue what you are doing.

     

    this is surely true in theory.

    but how do I know if I understand d4/d5?

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #15

    dzikus

    Tarrasch is good for your overall chess improvement, you learn how to play with the isolated pawn which is a very important skill. Isolated pawn formations are rather frequent and can result from various openings.

    You might try Blumenfeld gambit, too. Black gets powerful pawn centre if white accepts the gambit. It is a bit similar to Benko but has much less theory because it is not played frequently.

    If you only wanted something good I would recommend Nimzo-Indian. Since you need something with little theory it is definitely not a good choice (Nimzo is not much less developed than KID)

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #16

    chessBBQ

    Don't shy away from theory.Play what you enjoy playing first and study them.When you get bored try something else.Sure the KID has alot of theory,the Nimzoindian has a lot of theory but you can wing this openings using principles alone.You can fix the difficult positions later on as you play them.Playing a variety of d4 defenses will help you in the long run especially if  youre a d4 player yourself as white.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #17

    TitanCG

    dzikus wrote:Tarrasch is good for your overall chess improvement, you learn how to play with the isolated pawn which is a very important skill. Isolated pawn formations are rather frequent and can result from various openings.You might try Blumenfeld gambit, too. Black gets powerful pawn centre if white accepts the gambit. It is a bit similar to Benko but has much less theory because it is not played frequently.If you only wanted something good I would recommend Nimzo-Indian. Since you need something with little theory it is definitely not a good choice (Nimzo is not much less developed than KID)
    Tarrasch with g3 never made any sense to me. Black puts his bishop on f8, his other bishop on g4 and then back to e6 just waiting for White to do something. It's just nothing like any normal IQP game.
  • 18 months ago · Quote · #18

    cleocamy

    I am about your level and have had decent success using the Old Benoni and the Budapest.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #19

    Orgnar

    noleryer wrote:

    It doesnt matter what you play, pretty much every line against the QGD is incredibly drawish.

    This could be further from the truth, but not much.


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