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Chess for Oldtimers --- Good Idea !


  • 5 weeks ago · Quote · #1121

    motherinlaw

    owltuna wrote:

    Hi Bob!

    Oh!  You Remember the famous old "Hi, Bob!" drinking game!  -- the one spawned by the original "Bob Newhart Show."  I only learned about the game Years later, and I felt really left out of the whole thing.

    I'll leave this subject as soon as I've paid proper tribute to the three famed "Anything for A Buck" brothers from Newhart's second show "Newhart:"   

    "Hello.  I'm Larry.  This is my brother Darryl.  And this is my other brother Darryl."  (Can't you just See the Darryls, as they each silently "salute" hello to Bob?!)  No matter how bad a day I've had, that memory always puts a smile on my face and a spring in my step! ;-D 

  • 5 weeks ago · Quote · #1122

    AlCzervik

    What old timer doesn't remember or like The Honeymooners?

    To the moon with you!

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1123

    cabadenwurt

    AlCzervik wrote:

    What old timer doesn't remember or like The Honeymooners?

    To the moon with you!

    --- Ah yes, " The Honeymooners ". Years and years ago my nickname at work was " Ralphie-boy " ( I had a bad tendecy to give people heck back in those days  lol ).

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1124

    motherinlaw

    cabadenwurt wrote:
    AlCzervik wrote:

    What old timer doesn't remember or like The Honeymooners?

    To the moon with you!

    --- Ah yes, " The Honeymooners ". Years and years ago my nickname at work was " Ralphie-boy " ( I had a bad tendecy to give people heck back in those days  lol ).

    I especially liked Alice for her feminist confidence, and Norton because ... well, who doesn't have a soft spot for the underdog?  

    Ralph and Norton were so much like Oliver Hardy's and Stan Laurel's characters -- a big, blustery guy who thinks he's smart but isn't, and a clueless skinnhy guy who's always saying and doing Really dumb things, thus giving the big guy lots of chances to feel superior.  Meanwhile, we're in the audience, feeling secretly superior ourselves, as we're laughing, with genuine fondness, at both of them.  

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1125

    Javan64

    I always liked Jackie Gleason..."and awaaay we go!"

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #1126

    cabadenwurt

    Thanks for the posts.

    I recently read that the western World is having a Vitamin E problem. As people are going more low-fat in their diets they end up with a shortage of Vitamin E which came mainly from vegetable oils ( & we are reducing fatty oils ). Vitamin E is very useful in heart disease prevention. It is possible to get some Vitamin E from almonds and sunflower seeds but we are not getting enough of this vitamin. For a lot of people taking Vitamin E as a supplement ( in pills ) might be a good plan.

  • 13 days ago · Quote · #1127

    cabadenwurt

    I feel that a bit of humour is needed here: The follies which a man regrets most in his life are those which he didn't commit when he had the opportunity. 

  • 13 days ago · Quote · #1128

    letsgohome

    How about oldtimers teaching kindergarteners to play chess. Can you envision the benefits (socially, intellectually, and emotionally) of both parties involved? 

  • 13 days ago · Quote · #1129

    AlCzervik

    cabadenwurt wrote:

    I feel that a bit of humour is needed here: The follies which a man regrets most in his life are those which he didn't commit when he had the opportunity. 

    Agreed. I believe it's better to regret something you did as opposed to something you didn't do.

    (gotta take some chances sometimes).

  • 13 days ago · Quote · #1130

    blueemu

    I just asked my 78-year-old mother about that, and she said it works the same way for women.

  • 5 days ago · Quote · #1131

    cabadenwurt

    blueemu wrote:

    I just asked my 78-year-old mother about that, and she said it works the same way for women.

    --- Thanks for the posts.

    As we get older we may look back and see a few things that we would like to change if we could go back in time. All I can say is that if I had been a bit smarter when I was younger then I would be a lot smarter today  lol.

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #1132

    motherinlaw

    letsgohome wrote:

    How about oldtimers teaching kindergarteners to play chess. Can you envision the benefits (socially, intellectually, and emotionally) of both parties involved? 

    Absolutely!  I'm giving once/week chess "lessons" to a neighbor's 9 year old, and can testify to the mutual benefits.  

    (The "lessons" are free of course, and I put the word in quotes, because I barely know what I'm doing when I'm Playing chess, much less Teaching it.  Kids, happily, don't know the difference, so this one thinks I'm cool. Cool)

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #1133

    ponz111

    It is a great idea for oldtimers to teach 1 or more kids about chess [at no charge]  If you are on friendly terms with your neighbors and they have kids from age 7 to 10 [or so] and are willing--teach them to play chess!

    I had a kinda different experience.  When I was 12 [more than 60 years ago] I was able to go to a retired ministers house [he must have been age 70 or above but he was a very good player, one of the best in the city of Decatur, Illinois] and play many games of chess.  I remember his wife always had Lawerence Welk in the background.  

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #1134

    ponz111

    I remember Hop along Cassiday, The Shadow, Amos and Andy, The Long Ranger etc etc.

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #1135

    paidro

    "heh heh heh the shadow knows" ( b4 tv)

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #1136

    motherinlaw

    Thanks for the Memories, ponz!  

    I share All of them (including having grown up in the Midwest -- plus the memory of paidro's "The Shadow Knows").  

    All of them, that is, Except for your early chess "lessons" with a Really Good Player (an exception you might have deduced from my current rating Wink).

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #1137

    electricpawn

    ponz111 wrote:

    It is a great idea for oldtimers to teach 1 or more kids about chess [at no charge]  If you are on friendly terms with your neighbors and they have kids from age 7 to 10 [or so] and are willing--teach them to play chess!

    I had a kinda different experience.  When I was 12 [more than 60 years ago] I was able to go to a retired ministers house [he must have been age 70 or above but he was a very good player, one of the best in the city of Decatur, Illinois] and play many games of chess.  I remember his wife always had Lawerence Welk in the background.  


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