Targeting 1400

pdve

I don't advise you to play this variation of the berlin. Instead of 0-0 play d3 supporting your e4 pawn and preparing c3 to follow taking better control of the center aiming at d4 soon after transferring your knight from b1 to d2 to f1 to g3. From there you eye the f5 square and your 'spanish' bishop will end up at c2 after being kicked from its present position. from here you can make plans to attack the king but more likely it will be a long drawn out struggle between your struggle to capture the center and the opponents plan to gain queenside initiative and control of the c file.

Giasira
Next time you face the Ruy Lopez, I`d advise to go for a setup as shown below. I instantly play 3.a6 when my opponent plays 3.Bb5, usually they will retreat the bishop, and you can push your pawn to b5 at your leisure. Then just consolidate with d6, Be7, O-O, and play Na5. In the diagram above (which results from the main line) the plan is to push your pawn to c5 and get your knight back to c6. If white doesn`t retreat the bishop just take it. The LSB is usually the strongest piece for white in the Ruy Lopez.
 
 
 
 
I think you played the endgame very well. Good job on activating the king. By blindly grabbing pawns your opponent got a knight in the corner while you gained a strong central king, ultimately winning you the game. 
 
By the way, are you aware of the en passant rule? On move 37 when white moved b5 you could have taken his pawn. Here is a video showing how it is done https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJtfOjqy07Y

 

WilliamShookspear
Giasira wrote:
Next time you face the Ruy Lopez, I`d advise to go for a setup as shown below, the plan is to push your pawn to c5 and get your knight back to c4. If white doesn`t retreat the bishop just take it. The LSB is usually the strongest piece for white in the Ruy Lopez.
 
 
 
 
I think you played the endgame very well. Good job on activating the king. By blindly grabbing pawns your opponent got a knight in the corner while you gained a strong central king, ultimately winning you the game. 

 

I have studied this line. Theory begins at move 18. Also you only come into c4 when your opponent allows it. Much more often you come back to c6. 

Giasira
WilliamShookspear wrote:
Giasira wrote:
Next time you face the Ruy Lopez, I`d advise to go for a setup as shown below, the plan is to push your pawn to c5 and get your knight back to c4. If white doesn`t retreat the bishop just take it. The LSB is usually the strongest piece for white in the Ruy Lopez.
 
 
 
 
I think you played the endgame very well. Good job on activating the king. By blindly grabbing pawns your opponent got a knight in the corner while you gained a strong central king, ultimately winning you the game. 

 

I have studied this line. Theory begins at move 18. Also you only come into c4 when your opponent allows it. Much more often you come back to c6. 

 

I edited my answer. I meant c6. I still get confused with squares :/

WilliamShookspear

grin.png I thought that might be it. Though ...Nc4 can happen if they play b4!

mtashev56

@pdve Is "knight from b1 to d2 to f1 to g3" standard practice or just targeting in this position?

@Giasira Yep I know about en passant, but I considered my pawn advanced and he would recapture with his other pawn. That's why I didn't do it. Looking at it now, I could recapture and have my two pawns advance afterwards. Regarding Bb5: I will try a6, b5 to kick the Bishop away. Then I assume king-side castling would be better.

pdve
mtashev56 wrote:

@pdve Is "knight from b1 to d2 to f1 to g3" standard practice or just targeting in this position?

@Giasira Yep I know about en passant, but I considered my pawn advanced and he would recapture with his other pawn. That's why I didn't do it. Looking at it now, I could recapture and have my two pawns advance afterwards. Regarding Bb5: I will try a6, b5 to kick the Bishop away. Then I assume king-side castling would be better.

@mtashev56 yes the knight maneuver is standard in the ruy lopez. expert opinion has it that n to c3 is horrible positionally. in the ruy white often tries to get a center control.

mtashev56

Game #6: Black, 15|10, win:

Overview: So this game I decided to defend with Sicilian (at which I'm a complete beginner). The game went very well and it was a pretty tactical one. In this instance, I'm most curious about the opening itself and the pawn structure. Also if there was a better way to play the Nd7 situation.

 

ChessBoy513
mtashev56님이 썼습니다:

Game #6: Black, 15|10, win:

Overview: So this game I decided to defend with Sicilian (at which I'm a complete beginner). The game went very well and it was a pretty tactical one. In this instance, I'm most curious about the opening itself and the pawn structure. Also if there was a better way to play the Nd7 situation.

 

VERY GOOD. No mistakes in my opinion.

Giasira

I think playing e4 if you have the opportunity in the Sicilian is a very good idea. As you saw white had a very nice idea of bringing his knight to e4 and then using the pawn he got to establish on e5 as an outpost. Lukcily for you he dropped a pawn before he got that far. You would block in your DSB by playing e5 that is true, but this setup is very commonly played in systems like the Kings Indian Attack or the Kings Indian Defence. Usually you will advance your f-pawn and sooner or later you can push your e-pawn further, freeing up your bishop. I`m no positional expert but I`m going through Bobby Fischers games now and he regularily adopted setups with a  temporarily blocked fianchetto bishop to good effect. 

mtashev56

Game #7: Black, 15|10, loss:

I'm testing the Sicilian again. This time I think my opening was sloppy and I had no idea how to respond to white's moves. However, I felt comfortable (and with a slight lead) in mid-game, at which end I made quite a blunder. The rest of the game was somewhat training defensive play for me. I think I made more than the usual amount of mistakes/blunders at every stage of the game.

 

Giasira

I`m doing quite a bit of study of positional chess now, so hopefully I can chime in with some advice. These observations are just general ones and I hope someone higher rated than me can correct me if I`m wrong 

1. That f6 move to strengthen your pawn structure looks to have weakened your position considerably, as you saw it gave white the opportunity to play for Ng6, also you made lots of light square weaknesses around your king, which the queen could exploit. Another observation is your bishop became a typical "bad bishop" effectively just a tall pawn with no scope. You could maybe have tried to get it to a5 where it would cut into white`s position.

2. You could have taken steel control of the only semi-open file in the position by doubling rooks on the c-file, this combined with a queen on a4 and bishop on a5 would put a lot of pressure on white. If given time you could have tried to advance your a and b pawns ahead of an attack.