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Can the Knight move up 1 and over 2 as well as up 2 and over 1?

  • #1

    I am confused. All the instructions I have seen say up 2 squares and over 1 square. But can the Knight also move up 1 square and over 2? That is also an L shape. 

     

  • #2
    Yes.

    Google "chess knight moves" and you will see diagrams of a knight in the middle of a board with all his possible moves.

    I would upload one, but as am using the app can't, I'm afraid.
  • #3

    Thanks! I wonder why most instructions don't also say up 1 and over 2. I'm a beginner and it seems obvious to state that as an option as it lands you in a completely different position.

  • #4
    And of course it can go two down, one across, one down, two across as well.
  • #5
    Fun fact- Knights move the way they do to represent how a horse man can ride straight and slash their sword at emended to either their right or left.
  • #6

    The Knight moves 1 square straight in any direction along a file or rank, then 1 square diagonally in a forward manner (away from it's starting square).

    The Knight does not "jump" over squares but rather "through" the 1st square to arrive at it's destination.

  • #7
    VicountVonJames wrote:
    Fun fact- Knights move the way they do to represent how a horse man can ride straight and slash their sword at emended to either their right or left.

    This is not a fact at all. Just some "made up" nonsense.

  • #8
    Really? Seems, reasonable, I can't remember where I heard it tho.
  • #9

    Seems reasonable and romantic, but you just "made it up".

  • #10
    I did not, I have heard it from somewhere else. Wikipedia, I think.
  • #11

    I always thought of it as 2 up and 1 over. I guess some folks see it the other way? Either way it becomes natural after a while and you don't even think about it.

  • #12

    The Knight piece is generally associated with the Calvary. Horse's going into battle would take on a flanking maneuver to the side and surround the enemy. This is all speculation of course,  

  • #13
    Not wiki, I just checked.

    But somewhere.
  • #14
    I have heard that theory before. But I did like the one of the swordsman, a lot more romantic.

    Some believe that the rook represents either a siege tower (Wikipedia) but I think it may be Knights or dis-mounted men of arms- heavy, strong, and straight fighting. Like a bulldozer, of sorts.

    But that is just my idea.
  • #15
    Others say the knight moves the way it does as it is loyal to the state (the rook) and the church (the bishop) and it does both- one foreward. One diagonal. The King is loyal to both, but may not exercise both too much, as if to show favourites, but must do them in moderation. The queen does both all the time, tho. :P

    That one is from a fellow user. I can find his comment if you want.

    Using this idea, I think pawns charge and move for the state, but fight for religion and protection of religion.

    That pawn bit is my speculation and spent make much sense.

  • #16

    Close the eyes and visualize the Knight move. The traditional L shape. Next try and alternative explanation. 1 square straight (along a file or rank in any direction) then 1 square diagonally in a forward manner (away from the original square). This method of describing the how the Knight moves is superior in the mind of many instructors and is used quite extensively.

  • #17

    Wiki is a poor source for referencing these type of questions. It gives an uneducated "1 persons" perspective from a non chess playing editor. 

  • #18

    The knight can go to one of the closest squares to it but not on the same diagonal/rank/file. ( FIDE rule. )

  • #19

    I've heard a knight move described as moving from one corner of a 3x2 rectangle to the opposite corner. I like that definition, and I find it easier to visualize.

  • #20

     

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