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Getting kids into chess

  • #1

    Hey, sorry for asking questions that are probably being asked daily. But Id like to have the chance to respond to responses if necessary here.

     

    This will obviously differ a lot from kid to kid, but what age seems appropriate to start playing chess with kids? Is there anything that helps figuering out if the kid is ready?

     

    Also are there any tricks that make the game more enjoyfull maybe less "boring" for young ones?

     

    I kinda fear that the kids I want to introduce to chess may be turned off by it heavily if they dont enjoy it quickly. And chess takes some time to get used to, apparently

     

    Also, since I wont ever lose a game to them, early on at least, is it adviceable to make bad moves and if so at what frequency? (This question applies to anything I guess, and will also again vary heavily from kid to kid)

     

    Im thankfull for any kind of tipps/informations/links.

  • #2

    As per my reading normally 5-6 age is appropirate. but if he takes interest early you can start. My son play tournament at the age of 4 and recently won the trophy.

    To make more interesting you have to loose with them so they will enjoy  playing with you. don't try to teach more. let them enjoy!!

  • #3
    dineshrpatil2013 wrote:

    ....

    To make more interesting you have to loose with them so they will enjoy  playing with you. don't try to teach more. let them enjoy!!

    I don't know about losing on purpose. Most kids will realize what you did and dislike the win. I'm not saying that is the case for all kids and you can take their temperment into consideration when making that decision. However, they will feel much better when they finally beat you legitimately.

    One method I have heard was to allow the player to switch sides whenever they want to. So, if you are playing and get a stronger position they can take over and play that side of the game.

  • #4

    Thanks for the answers so far. I like the idea with the side switching, that sounds fun.

     

    I guess in the end Ill just have to try and see how it goes.

  • #5

    I just read some ideas on this, i will try and replicate them here (not my ideas and not sure where I read them):

    1. Start with just the pawns, first ine to get a pawn to the eighth rank wins. Then add the K (with all the rules about check, etc.), then add the Knights then Bishops, etc.

    2. Use both Knights on each side, first one to capture one of the opposing Knights wins. Then add random Pawns that cannot move and cannot be captured. Then let them capture with the Pawns, then let them move and capture with the pawns.

    3. Try the same type of thing with the Bishops.

    4. Put a Knight on a1 (white) and h8 (black), first one to the other sides starting square wins.

    Games like that may help keep their interest as they learn the rules and liece movement.

  • #6

    I actually have the following books and it is interesting and might be worth it for someone following the topic:

    http://www.amazon.com/Thinking-Chess-Teaching-Children-Ages/dp/1936277360/

  • #7

    Nowadays, most children encounter chess through video games on their tablets or smartphones.  This is a shame as to imagine life in the three-dimensional battle of chess helped me to realise the influence of chess pieces.  Also the tactile nature of the chess-pieces was part of the enjoyment and the advice to "sit on your hands" before making a move was a wise check against impulse.

    So wean your prodgeny on the wood/plastic real-life board as soon as you can, the joy will be theirs.

  • #8

    Forgot to mention the fun of suicide chess.  It teaches more lessons in a fun way.

  • #9
    Pawn wars is a great exercise. Other exercises with few pieces should be played before all the pieces come out. Queen against king. The queen needs to confine the king to two square to win. Queen against eight pawns. If a pawn promotes, the pawns win. If the queen captures all the pawns, she wins. Let the child turn the board around and switch sides when defeat seems imminent. Put a limit on the number of turns.
  • #10

    Kids do enjoy knight puzzles. Try setting up a pawn capture with their knight. If they are complete beginner, set up where the knight can capture the pawn  in two moves. As they got better at it, increase the number of moves that it will take the knight to capture the pawn.

    Kids enjoy learning two mate with the rooks. Give them also simple two move mate and 1 mate problems. Let them solve easy fork and pin tactics.

    Show them pictures, at the internet, of manny kids playing chess as it could inspire/motivate them.

    As they got better, you must have good tactical materials appropriate for them I suggest you look at books like Tactics Time or World Champions Guide to Chess by Polgar.

  • #11

    I learned chess at 7 years when my father teach me the basic rules. He was a good player but he did not know things like pawns can move two squares on first move, castling, and en passant. My motivation in those days was to beat my father in one game. I think after six months and almost 20 games, he felt bad because I was losing every time, so he lost on purpose just so I would stop playing him. After that I played many chess games with my friend. Looking back after these years, it reminds me of the famous 80s world championship matches between Kasparov and Karpov. I think even after 50 games between us the score was something like 24 wins me, 23 wins him, maybe 3 draws. Of course being at my level today, I can safely say that our games were very very bad quality, for example we did not know any openings, but it does not matter because we had fun and I liked to compete with him. Later he quit chess and lost interest in it, but I found internet chess and my love for the game grew even more.

  • #12

    I am just 11 but my rating is 1236 live standard

  • #13
    Harish73 hat geschrieben:

    I am just 11 but my rating is 1236 live standard

    Mind telling me how you got interrested in chess?

     

    Also thanks for all the great suggestions guys. The few pieces games work quite well, eventho the kids always are against it at first because they want to play the real game. Ive noticed, as always, with kids its mostly about the way I engange them rather than the actual task.

  • #14

    Well........... the best way is to tell em sit there & study the freakin game & they better like it or else.

  • #15

    kids like mate in one and simple tactics

  • #16

    Mind telling me how you got interrested in chess?

     

    Also thanks for all the great suggestions guys. The few pieces games work quite well, eventho the kids always are against it at first because they want to play the real game. Ive noticed, as always, with kids its mostly about the way I engange them rather than the actual task.

    Said by Heronnymo 

    What is u r age?

  • #17

    Im 27, my nephews/niece that I want to teach are 6-9.

  • #18

    when i was younger my dad let me win to make me like the game more.

  • #19
    2007chess wrote:

    when i was younger my dad let me win to make me like the game more.

    Yes, my father too. But now I am stronger then him, he tells "Why did I lose at that time, now I cannot win against you" Ha ha.

  • #20
    mnostrant wrote:

    kids like mate in one and simple tactics

     

    I created 150 one and two move exercises especially for children. First they were on worksheets that I distributed in after school clubs, but now are available to anyone with a Kindle reader (i.e. smart phone). https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XKG1VZD

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