Stuck at 890

daniel572
About 5 months ago, I decided I wanted to learn how to play chess. I have seen some chess videos and done some tactics training, but I kinda of auck at it. I would really like to be an average chess player, but I don't know how to get there. Should I learn openings? Do more tactics? Play more games? What do you suggest?
HorribleTomato

Play longer games, analyse them afterwards. You can even do that here.

jambyvedar

You are still a new player, so have patience. Focus your study at tactics. Reduce your blunders. With an improve tactical ability, you will spot tactics that wins material or matting combination. You will also see better the threats of your opponent.Study all the tactical themes in this link.

 

http://www.chessfornovices.com/chesstactics.html

 

After studying the above, solve tactics problems everyday.

 

Study this also. Top 8 Chess Mistakes.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzG-mJgj-E4

 

 

412364
Ratings on chess.com, to me, are not entirely a reliable measure of a player’s overall “talent.” There are many other online sites for Chess and ChessTactics. If one has the time OTB Chess with club Chess is good but heck who has the time... I play for fun.
PremierChess64

I'd consider getting a coach.

I am a National Master with 10+ Years of Teaching Experience, available for private and group lessons. To learn more about my chess services and general chess news, see www.premierchess.com or
www.facebook.com/premierchess.

 

Email me at erabin66@gmail.com or call (917)776-1306 today to set up a free 30 minute consultation or ask any questions.

drmrboss

500 rating in 5 months is decent. You cant magically get 1200-1300 unless about minimum 2 years of play. And then 100 per year is average for most people up to 1500

 Above that you need extensive and systematic study.

HorribleTomato
  1. chess_is_9ay wrote:

    You should quit because chess is not your strong point. Your time is better spent focusing on an area in which you thrive in. For example, are you perhaps good at the art of self-pleasure?

N. O. DO not start this again.

 

Push on, man. You can do it!

Take a break, work at your pace. You'll get it happy.pnghappy.png

 

IMBacon

Opening Principles:

1. Control the center squares – d4-e4-d5-e5

2. Develop your minor pieces toward the center – piece activity is the key

3. Castle

4. Connect your rooks

Tactics...tactics...tactics...

 

Pre Move Checklist:

1. Make sure all your pieces are safe. 

2. Look for forcing move: Checks, captures, threats. You want to look at ALL forcing moves (even the bad ones) this will force you look at, and see the entire board. 

3. If there are no forcing moves, you then want to remove any of your opponent’s pieces from your side of the board. 

4. If your opponent doesn’t have any of his pieces on your side of the board, then you want to improve the position of your least active piece. 

5. After each move by your opponent, ask yourself: "What is my opponent trying to do?"

Taskinen

I would really suggest checking out this video series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KoBAr08PApk

Tal Baron teaches the basic principles in a way that is really easy to understand, while coaching a 1400 rated player. I had been doing a lot of tactics trainings, lessons and playing practice games, but I believe this video series really made me jump from 1000 to 1200 rated player.

I also like to watch a lot of agadmator and ChessNetworks videos as well, they're bit more informative, but I believe this video series is best for getting the basic principles and the correct mindset. FishEyedFools above has a great premove checklist, which Tal Baron also uses. Just a bit different, but pretty much the same. "What is the threat?" "What can I do about the threat?" "What is my worst piece and how can I improve it?"

Then just keep going and practice. When I started chess at the end of last year, I was struggling at 700-800 rating and after couple hundred games managed to make it to 1000 or so. Now I've been steadily climbing to 1100-1200 rating and have managed to win couple close to 1300 opponents.

The worst part of learning is the beginning, when everything seems to go over your head - but after enough of practice you'll start to realise things you've learned automatically - and just see things more clearly than you used to.

I'm not a great player by any means, but I've improved about 500 points from that 700 rating I first descended to, so I guess I'm moving to the right direction. :-)

Good luck on your journey to 1000+, 1100+ and 1200+ and further! I'm on my way towards 1300, small steps at a time!

2Late4Work

FishEyedFools wrote:

Opening Principles:

1. Control the center squares – d4-e4-d5-e5

2. Develop your minor pieces toward the center – piece activity is the key

3. Castle

4. Connect your rooks

Tactics...tactics...tactics...

 

Pre Move Checklist:

1. Make sure all your pieces are safe. 

2. Look for forcing move: Checks, captures, threats. You want to look at ALL forcing moves (even the bad ones) this will force you look at, and see the entire board. 

3. If there are no forcing moves, you then want to remove any of your opponent’s pieces from your side of the board. 

4. If your opponent doesn’t have any of his pieces on your side of the board, then you want to improve the position of your least active piece. 

5. After each move by your opponent, ask yourself: "What is my opponent trying to do?"

FishEyedFools wrote: Openi Principles:1. Control the cen. You want to look at ALL forcing moves (even the bad ones) this will force you look at, and see the entire board. 3. If there are no forcing moves, you then want to remove any of your opponent’s pieces from your side of the board. 4. If your opponent doesn’t have any of his pieces on your side of the board, then you want to improve the position of your least active piece. 5. After each move by your opponent, ask yourself: "What is my opponent trying to do?" I really have to compliment you for copy-paste this in so many threads. I mean, you always use of your own time to do this. So many players would never bother to do so.

2Late4Work

FishEyedFools wrote:

Opening Principles:

1. Control the center squares – d4-e4-d5-e5

2. Develop your minor pieces toward the center – piece activity is the key

3. Castle

4. Connect your rooks

Tactics...tactics...tactics...

 

Pre Move Checklist:

1. Make sure all your pieces are safe. 

2. Look for forcing move: Checks, captures, threats. You want to look at ALL forcing moves (even the bad ones) this will force you look at, and see the entire board. 

3. If there are no forcing moves, you then want to remove any of your opponent’s pieces from your side of the board. 

4. If your opponent doesn’t have any of his pieces on your side of the board, then you want to improve the position of your least active piece. 

5. After each move by your opponent, ask yourself: "What is my opponent trying to do?"

Sorry, my quote came out like a mess between the lines. I am new to this. I hope you can read it.

DannyLearnsChess
I have officially about a year since i even learned to play Chess. I made it ad much as 1150. This is is with very intense practice every day!
DannyLearnsChess
This is on another account. I made this one because i was bored
sheetspread3

Do 5 tactical puzzles and a chess mentor lesson every day. Watch matojelic and suren's channel on youtube. You will improve dramatically in 3-6 months.

TitanChess666
I think you should focus on tactics, since most games are decided by them at lower levels.
Guineaster
Tactics improved my rating from642 to1291
Guineaster
Agadmators channel is a nice channel to watch. Look it up!
flashpower
You should probably play games against harder opponents and analyse those games.
flashpower
Also do puzzles.
Funology

 Wow, everything PowerofHope has said in this thread is INSANE. 

There are lots of players who started quite late at chess and became not just good, but famous GMs (e.g. Korchnoi, Petrosian, Chigorin, Lilienthal to name a few). 

Furthermore, the average club player is about 1500 or 1600. Any club with an 1800 average is unusually strong.