Chess.com's Weekly Study: February 6th 2016

DailyFun

Hello Chess.com!

Starting with 2016, we will be posting a Weekly Study, courtesy of Yochanan Afek, Grandmaster for composing endgame studies. These challenging positions are designed to stimulate (and improve upon!) your creativity, depth of calculation, pattern recognition and pure imagination.

I. Kantorovic, 1952

Enjoy!

ze_great

FP

DaanNoordenbos

well first page i guess

Nutflush

Yep - more advertising required.

wayvire

Got this perfect except the last move. Why doesn't 6.Qg6 work? it looks just as good as Qg7. Am I missing something, or can there only be one solution in the program?

Apollys

Well that was fun, goanna have to take some of the other lines to an engine to see what's wrong with them

ze_great
Nutflush wrote:

Yep - more advertising required.

 Yes, indeed

WXZH

fp

DailyFun

Next one ready! 

 

https://www.chess.com/forum/view/endgames/chesscoms-weekly-study-february-14th-2016

cool64chess

Awesome!

Robert_New_Alekhine

1st Page!?

n9531l
ze_great wrote:
Nutflush wrote:

Yep - more advertising required.

 Yes, indeed

The downside to more advertising is that it will attract more of the Daily Puzzle crowd whose only contribution to the thread will be to post "fp".

One defect of the puzzle program being used is that it only allows for one correct move. Since these are sound studies, there will only be one key move, but afterward there will be cases where multiple moves are equally good, as in this study on White's fifth move.

n9531l
wayvire wrote:

Got this perfect except the last move. Why doesn't 6.Qg6 work? it looks just as good as Qg7. Am I missing something, or can there only be one solution in the program?

You're not missing anything. Both moves are equally good. Since the puzzle program can only accept one correct move, it will sometimes tell you a correct move is incorrect.

fightingbob

I'm always surprised and captivated with just how powerful discovered checks are.  Though these variations are not shown in the solution because all but one are mate-in-2, there is one mate-in-5: 3...Qf1+, 4.Kg3+ Kg1, 5.Qa7+ Kh1 (or 5...Qf2+, 6.Qxf2+ Kh1, 7.Qf1#) 6.Qh7+ Qh3+, 7.Qxh3+ Kg1, 8.Qg2#Normally 6...Qh3+ would not be played, accepting mate if not resigning before 7.Kg1 Qh2#.

There is no doubt this is not as pretty as the text beginning with 3...Kg1, but it is a good illustration how a discovered check can make the king dance like a marionette on a string.

Parenthetically, I initially looked for a way of escaping a perpetual check without the clever rook maneuver.  It is not possible.